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Make A Difference With These Organic Gardening Tips!

Welcome to the world of organic gardening! As you can see it is a very big world complete with all kinds of seed, tools, and so much more. The fact that organic gardening can be very personal can make it seem a bit impossible to find where to start. The tips below can help give you some suggestions.

A great gardening tip is to water your garden at night time. This ensures that the heat of the sun does not cause the water to evaporate, allowing for maximum absorption. This will help your plants get the appropriate amount of water they need in order to grow.

To make your garden more productive, allocate space based on what grows best in your area instead of simply choosing your most favorite crops. Although you may love beets, if tomatoes grow better in your climate then give them more room in your garden and make your beet plantings smaller. Ask your neighbors or take a look around your area to see what grows best in your region.

When designing your garden, choose high-yield crops, such as tomatoes and herbs. These items will allow you to maximize the space you have available in your garden. The more produce you can grow at home, the more money you can save in your grocery bill each month, so it pays to know what will produce the most for your efforts.

Use a mixture of vinegar, rubbing alcohol, and water to get rid of salt deposits. If you are having a problem of salt buildup on your clay pots, mix equal parts white vinegar, rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. Spray on the deposits and they will wash away with ease. Make sure to let the pots dry thoroughly before use.

If your flowers leaves are curling, this probably means they are not getting enough nutrients. The soil might not be rich enough, or some insects might be stealing the nutrients from your flowers. Look for eggs or bugs around the roots of your plants. Buy insecticide or additional nutrients for your plants.

To store your garden-fresh onions for use throughout the winter and avoid having them rot or mold, store them in pantyhose! Yes, pantyhose! Simply place the onions into the legs of pantyhose, and, to avoid letting them touch one another (which is what helps create mold and rot), place a twist tie between each onion and the next. To store, hang the pantyhose by the gusset in a cool dry place and cut off or pop a hole in the pantyhose to grab an onion when you need it.

For garden plants that crave and need a lot of water, use five gallon buckets to keep those thirsty fruits and vegetables happy. Simply drill or punch several 1/8″ to 1/4″ holes into the bottom of a five gallon bucket, fill with water and set near the parched plant. Gravity allows for a slow and steady watering of those plants and if you live in an area where you get frequent rain, you will be capturing plenty of rain water to keep those buckets fairly full all season long.

Try using latex or plastic gloves instead of cloth gardening gloves. Cloth gardening gloves do not block moisture well – a problem when working with moist soil, and they often get stiff, crinkly, and uncomfortable after a few uses. A sturdy pair of plastic or latex gloves, like those used for cleaning, are a much better choice. They protect against moisture, and cleaning is as simple as rinsing them off under a hose and hanging to dry.

An excellent way to store the goodies from a homegrown garden is to freeze them in small batches. Using small sealable plastic bags and cutting small amounts of fresh vegetables every few days will help store the extras from the garden. Just bag and toss in the freezer and the packets can be added at any time to soups and pastas year round.

To get rid of the snails plaguing your garden, set an open container of beer on its side where you usually find them. The snails will be drawn to the scent of the beer and trap themselves. If you’d like to make this trap even more effective, try adding a little bit of brewer’s yeast to the can.

If you don’t have someone to water your plants while you’re out of town, build a homemade watering device! Simply make a small hole in the bottom of a jug, block the hole, and then fill it with water. Place the jug near the base of the plant and remove whatever is blocking the hole. This will slowly give your plant the water it needs while you’re away.

Use groundcover to fill in bare areas of soil. Groundcover plants are very effective for ‘tying’ larger plants together and keeping weeds to a minimum. The earth needs to be well-cultivated, weeded and well-fertilized before you plant anything. In order for the plant to become well established, water thoroughly during dry spells and remove any weeds that may pop up. Fast growing groundcover plants include creeping thyme, sedum, ajuga, golden oregano, heuchera, lamium and vinca.

Grow evergreen plants. If you grow too many evergreen plants, your garden runs the risk of looking very gloomy, but a few well-placed evergreens can give a year-round framework. Choose evergreen plants with variegated or lighter green foliage, rather than sticking to darker colors. They can be used as a backdrop for spring and summer plants, and be the main attraction in the fall and winter.

Your plants need to grow in a rich soil. You can buy bags of soil but they can be quite expensive. You can also easily create your own: you need to use perlite, vermiculite and peat in equal quantities. You should also add a small quantity of lime and compost if needed.

In the world of organic gardening, there are many techniques that you have at your disposal to grow a healthy garden. The world of organic gardening has a little something for everyone, but what works for one person’s garden may not for another garden. Hopefully, these tips have given you a starting point for your own organic garden.

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3 comment  view:3   blogger:0 view

  1. gardening tips 9093

    The fall season has arrived and the task of emptying our container gardens is at task. However, instead of storing your clay pots in a garden shed for the winter season, why not replace the summer annuals with edible fall vegetables. Having mums in your favorite clay pot signifies fall, however, consider adding alternative edible plants like leafy lettuces such as arugula, endive, bok choy and radicchio. When it is time for a quick salad, simply snip a few leaves, and you will instantly have delicious ready to eat salad.

  2. gardening tips 4376

    Avoid over watering your garden plants. If you saturate the soil, it becomes a haven for fungus that can negatively effect your plants. You also risk root rot when your soil is too wet. Water until the soil is wet, but not saturated, and check daily to see how much water you should add.

  3. gardening tips 3607

    Remember to disinfect your garden tools periodically. This important function should not be overlooked. When you cut away damaged or diseased parts of a plant, there can be residuals of the diseased plant left on your tool. If you do not clean your tool, you can spread the disease to healthy plants.

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