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Stained Glass Trichromy (2/2)

Stained Glass Trichromy (2/2)
Registry Cleaner
Votivekirche in Vinenna, Austria.

To contrast the color with a typical digital image, a fragment of this window can be seen in this image taken simultaneously.

See another stained glass window nearby (trichromy):
www.flickr.com/photos/7726011@N07/2150360177/
See an alcove nearby (trichromy):
flickr.com/photos/7726011@N07/2153707418/

I carry filters with me as I continue to learn three color photography . Briefly explained this involves exposing B&W negatives (Fuji Neopan 400) through color filters (Red 25, Green 58, Blue 47B for similar filter factor) then recombining the scanned images to give a technicolor image. I set up a small tripod in a Viennese church and tried to capture the bright colors of a stained glass window. I chose this one for the unusual labor camp theme. You may notice that the color layers are slightly out of registry because of slight camera movements during filter changing. I was very near the bottom of this window (and very far away from the top) making variations non-linear across the image (different at the top than at the bottom). I registered the lower half of the image as well as I could, but the top doesn’t quite line up. This problem would be avoided by eliminating camera movement or photographing perpendicular to the subject so that lateral movements give the same shift at all points in the frame.

If you want to read more about technicolor, trichromy and ‘old time movie toning’, try these threads:
www.flickr.com/groups/technique/discuss/72157602020995316/
www.flickr.com/groups/technique/discuss/34913/?search=tri…

Also check Henri Gaud’s Blog (in French) at
trichromie.free.fr/trichromie/

There are two Flickr groups devoted to the issue, both indicated to the right: "Trichromie-Trichromy, the three color process" and "Triple frame color".

"Harris shutter effect" artifacts are a problem if you want a clean photo. These will be minimized if you have a stationary target, use a good tripod, and don’t perturb you camera dramatically during the series of exposures. Alternatively, you can hide them in the background if they are small (relative to the resolution of your photo) or if they blend in with the existing color scheme as in this shot of fall foliage:
www.flickr.com/photos/7726011@N07/2532298283/

See a small example of normal, filtered and combined images here.

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